After the Bronze Age: The Sun-disk by Hilda Ellis Davidson (1969)

Source: 'Part II: After the Bronze Age,' Chariot of the Sun and Other Rites and Symbols of the Northern Bronze Age, 1969, pp. 139-145. Introduction The apparent breakdown of organized religion at the close of the Northern Bronze Age poses a problem for the archaeologist. The religious historian also must be concerned over the subsequent fate of … Continue reading After the Bronze Age: The Sun-disk by Hilda Ellis Davidson (1969)

The Anglo-Saxon Burial at Coombe [Woodnesborough]*, Kent by Hilda R. Ellis Davidson & Leslie Webster (1967)

*Coombe is a settlement in the English county of Kent. It lies between Ash-next-Sandwich and Woodnesborough. According to Edward Hasted in 1800, it was a hamlet in the western section of the parish of Woodnesborough. The village's name derives from Ancient Celtic cumbā "valley" which was taken into Old English. The name was recorded as æt … Continue reading The Anglo-Saxon Burial at Coombe [Woodnesborough]*, Kent by Hilda R. Ellis Davidson & Leslie Webster (1967)

The Golden Age of Northumbria by H.E. Davidson (1958) [Part 3: Christian Missionaries]

CHRISTIAN MISSIONARIES For a long time there had been talk at the court of King Edwin about the “Christians”. Men used to get together in little groups, sometimes in angry argument. As for the king, he said little, but it was noticed that he often sat silent as though he were thinking deeply. The ladies … Continue reading The Golden Age of Northumbria by H.E. Davidson (1958) [Part 3: Christian Missionaries]

Weland the Smith by H. R. Ellis Davidson (1958)

  WHEN King Alfred was translating Boethius from Latin into Anglo-Saxon and reached the phrase 'the bones of the faithful Fabricius', his mind seems to have jumped from the hero's name to the Latin word faber, 'smith', and from there again to the name which for him stood for the most famous of smiths, Weland. … Continue reading Weland the Smith by H. R. Ellis Davidson (1958)

Gods and Heroes in Stone by H.R. Ellis Davidson (1950)

To seek for illustrations of the legends and myths of the pagan past carved on the memorial stones and crosses of Anglo-Saxon is to embark on a subject which has provided wilder flights of interpretative fancy than perhaps any branch of Anglo-Saxon studies. On such a topic thought is indeed free, and the vague, often … Continue reading Gods and Heroes in Stone by H.R. Ellis Davidson (1950)