After the Bronze Age: Hands by Hilda Ellis Davidson (1969)

Source: ‘Part II: After the Bronze Age,’ Chariot of the Sun and Other Rites and Symbols of the Northern Bronze Age, 1969, pp. 158-159.   Like the footprints, the symbol of the hand is not prominent in the later heathen period. In the Roman period the hand was included among votive offerings, and one in … Continue reading After the Bronze Age: Hands by Hilda Ellis Davidson (1969)

After the Bronze Age: Ships by Hilda Ellis Davidson (1969)

Source: ‘Part II: After the Bronze Age,’ Chariot of the Sun and Other Rites and Symbols of the Northern Bronze Age, 1969, pp. 155-158. The Gotland stones of the fifth century A.D. frequently show a whirling disk with a ship beneath it, some with oars along the side, others including figures of the rowers and … Continue reading After the Bronze Age: Ships by Hilda Ellis Davidson (1969)

After the Bronze Age: Snakes by Hilda Ellis Davidson (1969)

Source: ‘Part II: After the Bronze Age,’ Chariot of the Sun and Other Rites and Symbols of the Northern Bronze Age, 1969, pp. 153-155. Throughout the heathen period serpents remain powerful symbols in Scandinavian art. In Roman times the serpent crowned with horns, a Bronze Age symbol, is still found associated with the war-god in Celtic art … Continue reading After the Bronze Age: Snakes by Hilda Ellis Davidson (1969)

The Geats of “Beowulf”: A Study in the Geographical Mythology of the Middle Ages by Jane Acomb Leake, Reviewed by H.R. Ellis Davidson (1968)

Reviewed Work: The Geats of "Beowulf": A Study in the Geographical Mythology of the Middle Ages by Jane Acomb Leake Review by: H. R. Ellis Davidson, Folklore, Vol. 79, No. 2 (Summer, 1968), pp. 147-149. THIS is a book of some importance for anyone interested in the supernatural elements in the Anglo-Saxon heroic poem Beowulf, … Continue reading The Geats of “Beowulf”: A Study in the Geographical Mythology of the Middle Ages by Jane Acomb Leake, Reviewed by H.R. Ellis Davidson (1968)

Loki in Scandinavian Mythology by Anna Birgitta Rooth, reviewed by H.R. Ellis Davidson (1962)

LOKI is one of the most puzzling figures in Scandinavian mythology. Was he originally god, giant, dwarf, the embodiment of evil, a fire or water spirit, or, as scholars are now inclined to think, a being resembling the Trickster in North American Indian folktales? Out of the many books attempting to find an answer, one … Continue reading Loki in Scandinavian Mythology by Anna Birgitta Rooth, reviewed by H.R. Ellis Davidson (1962)

Folklore and Man’s Past by H.R. Ellis Davidson (1963)

We realize now that folklore is not merely a study of survival - fossilized pieces of quaint tradition from a hypothetical past. Yet it does provide a link with the past, and as a student of early literature, archaeology and religion, this is the aspect of folklore studies with which I am most concerned. What … Continue reading Folklore and Man’s Past by H.R. Ellis Davidson (1963)

Reviews of “The Sword in Anglo-Saxon England: Its Archaeology and Literature” by Hilda Ellis Davidson (1962)

Review by: J.D.A. Ogilvy Source: The Journal of English and Germanic Philology, Vol. 61, No. 4 (Oct., 1962), pp. 908-909 Besides archaeology and documents ranging from wills to epic poetry, this book draws upon modern knowledge of metallurgy and on contemporary experiments in producing pattern-welded swords. Although it deals chiefly with English swords, it contains … Continue reading Reviews of “The Sword in Anglo-Saxon England: Its Archaeology and Literature” by Hilda Ellis Davidson (1962)