Reviews of “The Sword in Anglo-Saxon England: Its Archaeology and Literature” by Hilda Ellis Davidson (1962)

Review by: J.D.A. Ogilvy Source: The Journal of English and Germanic Philology, Vol. 61, No. 4 (Oct., 1962), pp. 908-909 Besides archaeology and documents ranging from wills to epic poetry, this book draws upon modern knowledge of metallurgy and on contemporary experiments in producing pattern-welded swords. Although it deals chiefly with English swords, it contains … Continue reading Reviews of “The Sword in Anglo-Saxon England: Its Archaeology and Literature” by Hilda Ellis Davidson (1962)

Weland the Smith by H. R. Ellis Davidson (1958)

  WHEN King Alfred was translating Boethius from Latin into Anglo-Saxon and reached the phrase 'the bones of the faithful Fabricius', his mind seems to have jumped from the hero's name to the Latin word faber, 'smith', and from there again to the name which for him stood for the most famous of smiths, Weland. … Continue reading Weland the Smith by H. R. Ellis Davidson (1958)

The Hill of the Dragon: Anglo-Saxon Burial Mounds in Literature and Archaeology by Hilda R. Ellis Davidson (1950)

A Paper read before a meeting of the Society on October I9th, 1949.1 THE idea of raising an imposing mound of earth to guard the bones or ashes of the dead is one which has roots deep in antiquity. " Man " said Sir Thomas Browne " is a noble animal, splendid in ashes and … Continue reading The Hill of the Dragon: Anglo-Saxon Burial Mounds in Literature and Archaeology by Hilda R. Ellis Davidson (1950)